But What Do I Know? . . . Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Jimmy Key, Brandon Morrow

My weekly observations and notes about some Canadian baseball stories: One of the best things about the Toronto Blue Jays signing catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia will be listening to Buck Martinez say his name on TV broadcasts. One of the worst things will be trying to spell his last name correctly. For the record, at 14Continue reading “But What Do I Know? . . . Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Jimmy Key, Brandon Morrow”

But What Do I Know? . . . Russell Martin, Justin Morneau, Jason Bay

My weekly observations and notes about some Canadian baseball stories: • Just how good has Russell Martin (Montreal, Que.) been in his first 10 big league seasons? His career WAR – an all-encompassing statistic that measures the numbers of wins a player (taking into account their offensive and defensive contributions) adds to their team aboveContinue reading “But What Do I Know? . . . Russell Martin, Justin Morneau, Jason Bay”

The 1954 Montreal Royals team photo . . . Billy Harris

His first professional baseball contract was signed in a quintessentially Canadian setting. New Brunswick native Billy Harris was competing in a hockey tournament in Buchans, Nfld., when Brooklyn Dodgers scout Bill O’Connor secured the stocky 19-year-old’s signature on a piece of paper. Although the five-foot-seven Harris was a standout stickhandler, it was his right armContinue reading “The 1954 Montreal Royals team photo . . . Billy Harris”

Baseball pioneer Larry Doby was a batting coach in Montreal

*I thought I would re-run this blog entry on baseball pioneer Larry Doby that I wrote back when I started Cooperstowners in Canada. Not many people read it at the time, but I believe Doby’s story is worth another look.* Like Jackie Robinson, Larry Doby, the first African-American to play in the American League, alsoContinue reading “Baseball pioneer Larry Doby was a batting coach in Montreal”

Roy Campanella’s 1947 season in Montreal was career turning point

Roy Campanella wasn’t one to wallow in his hardships. But if anyone had a right to be bitter, it was the stocky catcher from Philadelphia. Forced to endure unspeakable racial taunts as a minor leaguer, “Campy” persevered to become the best catcher in the big leagues from 1948 to 1957, only to have his careerContinue reading “Roy Campanella’s 1947 season in Montreal was career turning point”